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9 Beaches

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Dec 16, 2021
article - 9 Beaches

9 Beaches was a resort in Sandys Parish on the west end of Bermuda featuring access to nine beaches. This was historically Admiralty land (a satellite of the Royal Naval Dockyard), part of which was purchased in 1809 with more acquired in 1914 and 1915 for a Wireless Telegraphy station, and was transferred from the Royal Navy to the Royal Canadian Navy (later the Canadian Forces) in 1963. The station (by then known as CFS Bermuda) closed in 1995 and the property was earmarked for tourism use.

A cabin at the resort, in 2009

The resort closed down in 2010 for renovation, but plans for an $80 million restoration were unable to secure financing.[1] By 2017 the resort was home to a dozen squatters, who were evicted following a fire in January that year.[1]

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The resort, which billed itself as “ultra casual,” had 84 cottage tent style cabanas on stilts for rooms, many of them wading out into the Atlantic Ocean (the substantial naval buildings on the property were ignored in redeveloping it as visitor accommodation).[2][3] All rooms had a direct view of the water and many feature Plexiglas floors to allowing viewing of the ocean below.[2][4] The resort featured simple amenities in a natural setting. Rooms did not have telephones or televisions, but guests were given complimentary cell phones upon arrival.[5][6] Wireless internet is also available.[7] Bathrooms were small, with showers, but no bathtubs.[6] The resort was considered eco-friendly, employing solar panels and local plant landscaping.[2]

9 Beaches had a formal restaurant called Hi Tide, a bar and grill called Dark N’Stormy, and a “takeout shack.”[4] Breakfast was included in the cost of the room.[5] A surf shack on the property offered a variety of mostly water-based activities.[5] Some of the more exotic activities offered included a floating climbing wall, kite boarding, and trampolining.[7]

The property consisted of 18 acres, most of them beach front property.[4] Approximately 100 feet off shore is a rocky outcrop known as Daniel’s Head Island.[4]

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